County Planning Commission OK’s new goals statement

The Kenton County Planning Commission unanimously approved a new statement of goals and objectives on July 9. Action on this all-important policy statement shifts now to Kenton County’s 20 local jurisdictions. Each has 90 days to take action on the recommended language. If a jurisdiction fails to act by October 7—the 90th day—the jurisdiction will be deemed as having approved it.

“This process has been an excellent example of our community coming together to find common ground on some of today’s most diverse issues,” said Paul Darpel, chair of the Kenton County Planning Commission (KCPC). “We hope the Planning Commission’s action paves the way for Kenton County’s first totally new comprehensive plan in over 40 years.”

The development of these goals and objectives involved extensive public input and coordination over an 18 month period. One of the most discussed topics toward the end of that timeline was that of private property rights, the single issue that dominated the June 6 public hearing before the Kenton County Planning Commission. Following over three hours of testimony that evening, the KCPC directed staff to work with those who felt that the protection of property rights hadn’t been made strong enough.

NKAPC staff invited representatives from Kenton County’s 20 local jurisdictions to a June 26 meeting to discuss two specific concerns as directed by KCPC. Several cities’ representatives had been very vocal on property rights protection during the June 6 public hearing. Nine cities attended the meeting.

Discussion during this forum dealt with two issues: the guiding principle on property rights; and, an objective stating that unnecessary and burdensome regulations should be removed to promote job creation, attraction, and retention. After much discussion, those in attendance were able to agree on the language that was presented to and approved by the KCPC on July 9th.

“Approval of this statement of goals and objectives was a huge accomplishment,” said Dennis Gordon, FAICP, executive director. “Members of the planning commission and staff have every reason to feel extremely proud. With over 80 public meetings and numerous other public engagements behind them, these individuals brought a diverse community together to discuss—and ultimately agree on—a number of critical issues facing Kenton County.”

Adoption of the statement of goals and objectives paves the way for crafting a totally new comprehensive plan for Kenton County. The plan will build on the statement of goals and objectives by providing more detailed recommendations on land use, transportation, and community facilities’ issues. It will also include data collected by staff through research and analysis on local population, housing, economics, community facilities, health, agriculture, transportation, and the environment as required by state statutes.

Crafting the new comprehensive plan is anticipated to take six to nine months and will include even more opportunities for public involvement.