GIS staffer serves on national addressing task force

Posted on March 14, 2013
A senior NKAPC staff member is part of the National Emergency Numbering Association’s (NENA) workgroup charged with recommending a protocol for placing address points used in Next Generation 9-1-1 systems (NG911). As the name suggests, these systems are involved with emergency calls and the local services that respond to them.

Senior GIS Specialist Tom East, GISP, learned about the opportunity to serve at an addressing conference last year in Memphis.  He recognized immediately the importance of contributing to the recommendations. According to East, “There are important changes coming to the world of emergency dispatching and NG911 is driving many of the improvements in how emergency calls will be handled and services dispatched in the future.”

NG911 will improve the way emergency calls are sent to dispatch centers by determining which center should receive the call even before it is answered. Accomplishing this requires the creation of accurate GIS data ahead of time.  Highly accurate address locations and dispatch service boundaries will facilitate use of a digital “push-pin” map on which the caller’s location is determined so the correct dispatch center is identified before a call reaches the dispatcher. This instantaneous determination improves response time potentially eliminating the need to transfer calls between dispatch centers as often happens now with cell phone calls.

Over the past few years, NKAPC staff has created and updated a digital map of address points used by its partners in the LINK-GIS system including dispatch centers in Kenton, Campbell, and Pendleton Counties. The many situations encountered in creating this address database are encountered in communities across the nation. Likewise, the problems encountered elsewhere are often found locally.

As East puts it, “Participating in this NENA workgroup allows us to contribute to, and learn from other communities in establishing a protocol for placing address points. It’s a valuable opportunity, especially in light of current developments with local dispatch services.”


Engineering workload shows slight uptick in early 2013

Posted on March 14, 2013
Things beyond spring-flowering bulbs and trees may begin popping up this season in Kenton County if recent submissions to NKAPC’s infrastructure engineering department are any indication.  An increase in subdivision development activity may be eligible for inclusion to that list.

Staff has approved a plan for an addition to Battleridge, an existing subdivision, in Independence. Battleridge has multiple entrances and is interconnected with other existing subdivisions in the vicinity of Bristow and Cody Roads. The addition contains 41 acres, is approved for 75 new single-family lots.  This addition will also prompt construction of 3,000+ feet of new public streets in the city.

Another smaller subdivision approved, Stillbrooke, is a stand-alone development that will not interconnect with adjacent properties in the future. This is because there is no vacant property nearby and no opportunity to interconnect with existing subdivisions that are. This subdivision is on the east side of Collins Road in Villa Hills.  It contains nine acres and is approved for 26 single-family lots. The addition will prompt construction for a little over 1,000 feet of new public streets in the city.

Staff is also in discussions with developers who plan to move forward this year on new phases of other existing subdivisions. These are located primarily in Independence and Erlanger where new development activity was most prevalent before the 2008 crash and the Great Recession that followed.

 “Things are by no means close to where they were in the mid-2000s, and we don’t believe we’ll ever see them getting that busy any time soon,” said Scott Hiles, NKAPC’s director of infrastructure engineering. “But, it’s good to see activity moving in the right direction again.”

Hiles says the two approved developments are expected to begin this spring as soon as weather allows.

NKAPC, OKI sponsor transportation funding workshop

Posted on March 14, 2013
NKAPC staff coordinated and hosted a recent Surface Transportation Program for Northern Kentucky (SNK) workshop for Kenton County city and county officials.

SNK funds are federal funds made available to local jurisdictions through the Ohio-Kentucky-Indiana Regional Council of Governments (OKI). These projects include highway, transit and non-highway freight projects that anticipate needing funds in fiscal years 2015, 2016, or 2017. Nearly $12 million have been allocated to the program for these fiscal years.

Mark Paine, OKI’s Transportation Improvement Program manager, presented information to nine officials representing seven jurisdictions. He described the basics of the program, what projects are eligible, how to apply, and answered questions from attendees. Paine also elaborated on the program saying “for highway projects, these funds may be used for the design, right of way, utility, and construction phases.”

He also pointed out that projects receiving SNK funds would be required to meet the standard 20 percent local funding match requirement.

James Fausz, AICP, an NKAPC principal planner noted, “Historically, few Kenton County jurisdictions have sought these funds. Through this workshop, we hoped to give our local officials critical information about SNK funds so they can use them to improve our transportation network.”

Edgewood and Covington have received approximately $2 million for fiscal years 2013 and 2014.

Local officials who were not able to attend the workshop and would like more information on SNK funds are encouraged to contact Mark Paine at OKI. Completed applications are due to OKI by noon on April 12, 2013.

… for whatever it’s worth…

Posted on January 08, 2013
This month we continue a new feature initiated last September... for whatever it's worth. As NKAPC staffers keep themselves up to date regarding what's happening in other communities of the tri-state, the commonwealth, and the US, they find reports periodically that deserve a local audience.

This month we provide a September 2012 article from The Economist magazine. It provides information from recent studies that show automobile usage is declining in the US… and not just due to impacts of the Great Recession. If true, this trend could have far-reaching impacts on communities across the nation.

You can access the article here … for whatever it’s worth.

Views expressed in this article do not reflect an official position or policy of the NKAPC. The article is presented here to provide input for those interested in land use planning issues.


Staffer assumes chair of regional surveyors’ group

Posted on January 08, 2013
Northern Kentucky’s chapter of the Kentucky Association of Professional Surveyors (KAPS) has elected Steven Lilly, PLS, as its chairman for 2013. Lilly works with local surveyors through his role as Land Surveying Analyst at NKAPC. He has been a professional land surveyor since 2002 and has worked in NKAPC’s infrastructure engineering department since 2004.

KAPS was founded in 1968 and has grown to nearly 400 public- and private-sector members in multiple states. Its purpose is to maintain and perpetuate an organization for members having common professional problems and interest; to provide effective forums for discussion and united action on the part of its members for the enhancement and betterment of professional recognition, status and conditions of employment; and, for other matters which will contribute to the welfare of its members and the government and the people of the Commonwealth of Kentucky.


Task force ready with statement of goals, objectives

Posted on January 08, 2013
A proposed statement of goals and objectives for Kenton County’s first all-new comprehensive plan since 1972 is complete and nearly ready for legislative review. Final action will begin with a public hearing before the Kenton County Planning Commission and conclude with votes before each of Kenton County’s 20 local governments.

In its current form, the statement includes three guiding principles—public participation, economic considerations, and the necessary interrelationship between them. Each was a topic brought up frequently during the 70-meeting public input process that contributed greatly to the proposed statement. The guiding principles are intended to be considered in conjunction with each goal during the decision making process.

The goals and related objectives are organized in seven categories—mobility, the economy, healthy communities, natural systems, health, community identity, and governance. As with the guiding principles, these categories came directly from comments received at public meetings, small group meetings, city meetings, and subsequent discussions with the Direction 2030 task force.

“We took our time to speak and meet with any resident, organization, or legislative body that expressed an interest in the process,” said Sharmili Reddy, AICP, NKAPC’s planning manager. “We also sought out groups that are traditionally not involved in the planning process to get a well-rounded view on issues affecting our residents.”

When adopted by each of Kenton County’s 20 legislative bodies, the statement of goals and objectives will offer an integrated planning vision that recognizes the different planning needs of each of those elected bodies.

More information on Direction 2030—including the most current draft—can be found on the project website.


Area Planning Council elects new officers for 2013

Posted on January 08, 2013
Members of the area planning council—the 20-member board representing each of Kenton County’s local governments—met last week for their annual organization meeting. In addition to ongoing business, the group elected officers for 2013 and selected three individuals to serve on the area planning commission.

Those elected to serve as officers through next January’s organizational meeting are Fort Mitchell Mayor Chris Wiest as president, Edgewood Mayor John Link as vice-president, and Elsmere Mayor Marty Lenhof as secretary.
 
Covington Mayor Sherry Carran, former Park Hills councilman Dick Spoor, and former Fort Wright Mayor Gene Weaver, were selected to serve two-year terms on the area planning commission. These three will serve alongside former Fort Wright mayor Tom Litzler, Crestview Hills Mayor Paul Meier, former Fort Mitchell Mayor Bill Goetz, and Edgewood Councilwoman Nancy Atkinson through 2013.

The area planning council and area planning commission are responsible for the administrative affairs of land use planning in Kenton County. The council is made up of one elected official from each of the county’s 20 local jurisdictions. Among its responsibilities are review and approval of the annual budget, selection of seven individuals to oversee the staff, and selection of an independent auditor to review the organization’s books annually.

Despite assumptions to the contrary, the area planning commission holds oversight responsibilities for the staff. It does not make land use decisions as those duties are pursued according to state law by the Kenton County Planning Commission.

The area planning council and commission have served Kenton County since 1961. More information is available on nkapc.org.


Latest 2012 GIS digital images ready to be uploaded

Posted on January 08, 2013
Last year at this time, LINK-GIS partners were anxiously waiting for good weather so that planes equipped with special cameras could capture images for their GIS programs. The resulting images are now about to be uploaded to the LINK-GIS website next month for use by the public.

In addition to the benefits provided by the updated photography, LINK-GIS partners saved approximately $90,000 through a collaborative effort with the Commonwealth of Kentucky. By flying Kenton and Campbell counties together, the partnerships were able to save an estimated 15 percent of the projected cost.

It is important to note that each county pays only for data collected within its own territory.

Between the March 2012 aerial flight and now, the LINK-GIS team conducted quality assurance/quality control (QA/QC) review of the 1,693 individual images that provide a seamless view of Kenton and Campbell Counties. Every team member reviewed each product for image stretching, blurring, and precision standards that meet standards of the American Society of Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing. LINK-GIS data has met these standards since the first aerial acquisition in 1999.

Each of the two LINK-GIS partnerships consists of the county fiscal court and PVA along with SD1 and the Northern Kentucky Water District with NKAPC as managing partner.

The last time the LINK-GIS partnerships acquired these same imagery products was in 2007; five years ago. More information on LINK-GIS can be found on its website or nkapc.org.

KCPC committee nears completion of new regulations

Posted on January 08, 2013
Kenton County Planning Commission’s Subdivision Regulation Committee has completed its review of more than 600 suggested revisions to its draft subdivision regulations for Kenton County. That review resulted in a consensus between competing interest groups in most cases. The single issue that prompted the most discussion was street design and subsurface drainage.

“Since the Kenton County Planning Commission adopted its first subdivision regulations in the late 1970’s, the provisions haven’t included any requirement for subsurface drainage except in limited locations,” said Scott Hiles, NKAPC’s director of infrastructure engineering. “Staff was directed this time to change that and add new requirements that would achieve better performing streets that have fewer pavement failures over time.”

The draft regulations developed by staff included those provisions.

After months of review and comments from four main interest groups—the Northern Kentucky Homebuilders Association, the Northern Kentucky Society of Professional Engineers, Henry Fischer of Fischer Homes, and the Kenton County Mayor’s Group—the committee directed staff to revise the draft to:
•  limit concrete to crushed limestone aggregate to reduce D-cracking and surface deterioration;
•  increase pavement and subgrade cross-slopes for better pavement drainage;
•  increase the quality of expansion material at all expansion joints to increase their effectiveness and longevity;
•  increase amounts of expansion material at driveways, on the outside of street curves, and the terminus of the street to reduce the effects of street creep;
•  require edge drains under the curb where 51% of the adjoining lot drains toward the street and also in sag locations for increased subsurface drainage; and
•  require a detailed pavement analysis performed by a geotechnical engineer for each project to determine any other pavement and drainage enhancements that should be utilized.

The noted requirement for edge drains is similar to the design proposal made by the engineers’ group. While committee members did not direct staff to require a full drainage blanket under all pavements as the Mayor’s Group recommended, they attempted to address the issue by requiring a detailed pavement analysis on every project.

“The committee agreed that a drainage blanket is needed in certain situations,” said Hiles. “But it also believed that requiring them everywhere as a minimum standard was overkill. In the end they determined that a geotechnical engineer should decide precisely where they were needed following the required pavement analysis. The geotechnical engineer could also require other improvements such as more edge drains or longitudinal drains.”

Staff is currently in the process of crafting the new street design standards established by the committee. When complete, the committee will distribute the new standards to the four interest groups in preparation for a roundtable meeting tentatively scheduled for February 28th. The goal will be to give these four groups the opportunity to discuss the design proposal and to provide the committee with additional feedback. After this meeting, the committee will give staff a final directive on what design proposals should be included in the draft regulations.

The final step will be to schedule the resulting draft to a public hearing before the full county planning commission membership. The plan is to hold that hearing and adopt the new regulations this spring.


Brochure for identifying landslides available soon

Posted on December 08, 2012
The Kentucky Geological Survey (KGS), the University of Cincinnati (UC), and the local Hillside Trust are spearheading an effort to provide landslide information to local landowners in an easy-to-understand format. The organizations believe that more understanding is needed by local landowners regarding sensitivities present for landslides in this area.

Over the past year, KGS obtained LiDAR data from the LINK-GIS partnership and used these data to determine areas where landslides have occurred. KGS worked with UC staff to develop a large foldable two-sided document that has helpful photos, maps, and information. The Hillside Trust contributed $5000 to the effort so a smaller brochure could be printed for wider distribution.

KGS, UC, and the Hillside Trust will be continuing to work together while bringing other interested parties from Ohio and Indiana into the process. These groups are also in the planning stages for a symposium on landslides that would take place in the fall of 2013.

More information about the brochure will be published as this collaborative effort continues.


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