What's New?

Temporary outdoor dining to support economic recovery

Posted on May 14, 2020

PDSKC is working with local governments wanting to ease their zoning restrictions on outside dining. May 22, 2020, Kentucky restaurants will be allowed to reopen at partial capacity with outdoor dining in support of economic recovery. A list of other issues Kenton County cities and businesses should consider when reopening can be found here on PDSKC.org.



Staff continues to remote; all services available online

Posted on May 13, 2020

Our staff will continue to serve Kenton County residents and businesses remotely from their homes across the metro area and beyond through at least Friday, May 29th. This includes all services assigned to the organization by state law, interlocal agreements, partnerships, and contracts for professional services.

We extend the procedures that have been in place since March 16th to maintain the health of our staff and their families and to protect the well being of our customers.

Applicants for most of our review processes may submit required paperwork and fees through one of our online portals, precluding the need to interact face to face with staff. Please direct your questions regarding these processes or any other matter to them as usual—at 859.331.8980 Monday through Friday between 8 AM and 5 PM. Virtual meetings are an option staff can initiate as needed.

Staff is working diligently to keep turnaround times on applications and inspection requests in line with those processed before the COVID-19 lockdown. Permit applications should be submitted online, and staff will review drawings and return comments online. Requests for building inspections should be called in as usual.

Applications and appeals scheduled for public hearings before the planning commission, boards of adjustment, and code enforcement boards are being scheduled using online virtual meeting platforms. Meetings of the PDS Council and Management Board are as well. Agendas for these meetings and the URLs needed to attend these virtual meetings may be found on PDS’ website—www.pdskc.org.

Declarations and events will prompt changes to these parameters without much notice. If that happens, we will distribute those changes via our website and our social media platforms on Facebook and Twitter.

We continue to welcome feedback on all PDS programs, policies, and procedures. Use the satisfaction survey on our website to provide your comments.

Effective:   05.13.2020



PDS Board hires new executive director

Posted on May 04, 2020

Sharmili Reddy left Planning and Development Services of Kenton County five years ago to become City Administrator for Fort Mitchell. On Friday, she accepted an offer from the organization’s Management Board to become its fifth executive director. Current executive director Dennis Gordon will retire this summer after almost 18 years of service to Kenton County.

“Dennis gave us plenty of notice so we could find the best possible candidate,” said County Commissioner Joe Nienaber who serves as the Board’s chairman. “We advertised nationally and received resumes from quite a few exceptional people. In the end, we decided Sharmili’s previous PDS experience and her five years in Fort Mitchell made her the best candidate to move the organization forward.”

Reddy has a Bachelor of Architecture degree from BMS College of Engineering, Bangalore, India, and a Master of Community Planning degree from the University of Cincinnati. Her professional planning experience includes two years with the Center Regional Planning Agency in State College, Pennsylvania, and ten years with PDS before leaving for the post in Fort Mitchell.

“PDS has a long history of community impact in Kenton County and I am excited for the opportunity to come back and lead this organization,” said Reddy.

“Sharmili was a great contributor to our mission during her ten years on staff,” said Dennis Gordon, PDS executive director. “She provided great people skills and played a key role in developing Kenton County’s online comprehensive plan, Direction 2030. We hated to lose her when she left for Fort Mitchell.”

Direction 2030 received several state and national awards since its adoption in 2014 by the Kenton County Planning Commission.

PDS, formerly known as the Northern Kentucky Area Planning Commission, was created in 1961 following action in 1960 by the Kentucky General Assembly. Through the early 1980s it served as staff for the multiple citizen planning commissions that existed in Campbell and Kenton Counties. It has served as staff for the Kenton County Planning Commission and its 20 local governments since 1983. Interestingly, today marks the 59th anniversary of the organization’s first meeting held at the Covington City Building—a date the organization refers to as Founder’s Day.

“We’re talking with Sharmili now regarding her start date,” stated Nienaber. “I believe we can work things out so she can spend some time with Dennis before he leaves on the first of August.”



PDS fulfills responsibilities from 47 metro locations.

Posted on April 29, 2020

Our staff will continue to serve Kenton County residents and businesses remotely from their homes across the metro area and beyond for the near future. This includes all services assigned to the organization by state law, interlocal agreements, partnerships, and contracts for professional services.

We extend the procedures that have been in place since March 16th to maintain the health of our staff and their families and to protect the well being of our customers.

Applicants for most of our review processes may submit required paperwork and fees through one of our online portals, precluding the need to interact face to face with staff. Please direct your questions regarding these processes or any other matter to them as usual—at 859.331.8980, Monday through Friday between 8 AM and 5 PM. Virtual meetings are an option staff can initiate as needed.

Staff is working diligently to keep turnaround times on applications and inspection requests in line with those processed before the COVID-19 lockdown. Permit applications should be submitted online, and staff will review drawings and return comments online. Requests for building inspections should be called in as usual.

Applications and appeals scheduled for public hearings before the planning commission, boards of adjustment, and code enforcement boards are being scheduled using online virtual meeting platforms. Meetings of the PDS Council and Management Board are as well. Agendas for these meetings and the URLs needed to attend these virtual meetings may be found on PDS’ website—www.pdskc.org.

Declarations and events will prompt changes to these parameters without much notice. If that happens, we will distribute those changes via our website and our social media platforms on Facebook and Twitter.

We continue to welcome feedback on all PDS programs, policies, and procedures. Use the satisfaction survey on our website to provide your comments.

Effective:   05.01.20



Paperless and digital goals help with COVID-19

Posted on April 07, 2020

Goals PDS established in 2017 and 2019—and on which its staff worked diligently since then—prepared the agency for its current COVID-19 office closure. Those goals were to transition to a paperless office and to go digital for receipt of all permits, subdivision plats and plans, development plans, and building plans.

“I don’t know how we’d have functioned during this closure if we hadn’t taken the steps we took,” said Dennis Gordon, FAICP, executive director. “As it is now, our responsibilities are pretty much covered fully from 40+ remote locations around the metro area.” View locations map

Gordon suggests the ability of staff to be available for walk-ins and impromptu meetings suffers with the Kenton County Government Center being closed but “people are learning they just need to call for an appointment and that’s going well.”

The organization’s 2017 goal to go paperless was driven by two facts: PDS was beginning to face storage challenges for records that must be retained according to statute; and, technology was presenting options that made storage of huge amounts of data more accessible and less expensive than storing hard copies.

The 2019 goal to go digital was largely a product of customer demand. Developers and builders were submitting their plans digitally in increasing numbers. When the subject of submitting plans online was raised, members of the Building Industries of Northern Kentucky responded loudly with the question, “How soon can that be one?”

Gordon says the decision to move PDS’ offices to the new Kenton County Government Center provided the last piece to the puzzle: a deadline by which to complete the two transition goals. Staff is working now to reduce all of PDS’ old records to scans that can be stored digitally.

“We had very specific benefits in mind when we began working toward these goals,” said Gordon.  “They were all about efficiency and cost savings. For staff, that meant being able to access records quickly. For customers, that meant not having to drive to PDS’ offices to submit projects and receiving staff review comments digitally. In other words, a win-win result.”

Being able to work seamlessly and without delay from multiple metro locations is the icing on the cake, he says.



PDS staff is working remotely

Posted on March 31, 2020
PDS staff is working remotely

PDS staff members are working entirely from remote locations now in response to COVID-19 emergency declarations.

Staff continues to provide all services assigned to the organization by state law, interlocal agreements, partnerships, and contracts for professional services.

Turnaround time on applications as well as for inspection requests may increase slightly but staff will continue to process them as quickly as possible. Permit applications should be submitted online, and staff will review drawings and return comments online. If you need assistance, please call for support.

Matters scheduled for public hearings before the planning commission, boards of adjustment, and code enforcement boards through the month of April will be rescheduled as soon as Governor Beshear’s emergency declaration expires.

Declarations and events will prompt changes to these parameters without much notice. If that happens, we will distribute those changes via www.pdskc.org and our social media platforms on Facebook and Twitter.

Effective: 03.31.20

Downloadable PDF version



Updated operation details for PDS

Posted on March 24, 2020

Our office doors are closed, but PDS is still open for business!

We provide the following parameters for PDS operations from March 24th through April 30th.

PDS remains engaged fully in carrying out the responsibilities assigned to it by law, interlocal agreements, and contracts for professional services. We provide the following guidance to those who want or need to interact with our staff.

  1. The vast majority of PDS’ staff is working from their homes, but you can communicate with them by way of phone or email. Don’t come to our County Government Center offices unless you have a scheduled appointment. The staff person with whom you’re meeting will tell you how to access the building when they schedule your appointment. This is as much about your health as it is about staff’s.
  2. Don’t bring other people or children with you. Appointments are limited to a one-on-one basis.
  3. Staff continues to process applications for plan reviews and permits as quickly as possible. Turnaround time on these applications as well as for inspection requests may increase slightly but we will continue to process them. Past PDS efforts to provide services digitally will be a huge advantage for us during this period. Please submit your permit applications online and we will review your drawings and return comments to you online. If you need assistance doing this, please call the office for support.
  4. Matters scheduled for public meetings/hearings before the planning commission, boards of adjustment, and code enforcement boards through the month of April will be rescheduled as soon as Governor Beshear's emergency declaration expires.
  5. Declarations and events will prompt changes to these parameters without much notice. If that happens, we will distribute those changes through www.pdskc.org and our social media platforms on Facebook and Twitter.

Effective: 03.31.20

Downloadable PDF version



Kenton County Declares a State of Emergency

Posted on March 13, 2020

COVINGTON, Ky. (March 13, 2020) – Judge/Executive Kris Knochelmann has declared a proclamation of local emergency for Kenton County, Kentucky due to the growing public health impacts of the COVID-19 (Coronavirus).

What does this mean? This proclamation allows emergency services to activate internal processes for local and inter-jurisdictional disaster emergency planning and purchasing.

What does it NOT mean? This does not mean that schools, business, churches and other like organizations have to close. It is at the discretion of each entity to make the decision whether or not to remain in operation.

“Kenton County has been working with our local partners in response to COVID-19 in order to best protect our community” stated Judge/Executive Knochelmann.  “Residents are encouraged to check the County’s website regularly for local and state updates from the Health Department and the office of the Governor. Please keep your family and neighbors in mind going forward, and we will emerge stronger as a community on the other side of this event.”

Community members are encouraged to follow the Northern Kentucky Health Department (NKYHD) guidelines to protect against COVID-19 including:

·     Wash hands often with soap and water for 20 seconds. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer.

·     Stay home when you feel sick.

·     Get the flu vaccine.

·     Avoid touching your eyes, mouth and nose with unwashed hands.

·     Properly cover your sneeze and cough with a tissue, then throw away the used tissue.

·     Frequently disinfect objects and surfaces with a cleaner that you typically use.

·     Avoid close contact with those who are sick.

If you are feeling ill, please contact your physician first before going to the emergency room.

For up-to-date information about COVID-19, visithttps://nkyhealth.org/individual-orfamily/health-alerts/coronavirus/ or following the NKYHD on Facebook (@nkyhealth) and Twitter (@nkyhealth).



Historic Northern Kentucky Treasure Gets Boost from New Fund

Posted on March 06, 2020

Horizon Community Funds announces new conservation efforts for Licking River watershed

Covington, KY – Horizon Community Funds of Northern Kentucky has joined community partners to establish the Licking River Conservation and Greenway Fund, which supports land and water conservation and greenway initiatives in the Licking River watershed.

“This is an exciting, and critical, fund for us to offer Northern Kentucky,” says Horizon Community Funds President Nancy Grayson. “It shows the breadth of partnerships we’re able to create as a community foundation serving Northern Kentucky. Together, we can better address the many diverse needs of our community, including helping to preserve the natural and historical heritage of the Licking River.”

Through the new fund Horizon Community Funds and supporting donors will gather financial resources to invest in the conservation and stewardship of the Licking River, while helping to raise awareness of its value as a natural, historical, and economic resource.

The Licking River, named for the many prehistoric salt springs and licks in the region, is a historic and natural treasure for both Northern Kentucky and the Commonwealth. With ties to Native American history, the Revolutionary War, the Underground Railroad, and the state’s original bourbon journey, the Licking River watershed also sustains a wide range of biodiversity and boasts more mussel species than the entire continent of Africa.

Within the Northern Kentucky area, most of the Licking River watershed exists in Campbell and Kenton counties. Several creeks in the area act as tributaries to the river. 

For more information or to make a gift to the Licking River Conservation and Greenway Fund at Horizon Community Funds, visit www.horizonfunds.org or call 859.757.1552.

Comments from Project Partners:

Kris Knochelmann, Kenton County Judge Executive: “The Licking River is an incredible natural resource in our community. The Conservation and Greenway Fund will be another tool available to help protect this asset and make it accessible to folks for kayaking, canoeing, fishing, hiking, camping and a whole host of outdoor activities. The work to restore and conserve the Licking River watershed will be generational, but all great efforts start with seemingly small steps forward that compound significantly over time. If you want to be a part of potentially the largest land and water conservation effort in Kenton County’s history, let me know. We want to work with you.”

Steve Pendery, Campbell County Judge Executive: “The Licking River is central to the story of Northern Kentucky. The streams of twenty-three Kentucky counties lead to this place, and hundreds of years of the Commonwealth’s history flow along with it. The Licking River Conservation and Greenway Fund fills a gap in the tools available to our community to conserve and activate this natural asset. I appreciate Horizon Community Funds’ partnership in creating this mechanism, and hope that it fulfills its potential to assist in conserving and restoring the watershed’s corridor. This is a long-term project, but I’m excited at the steps being taken forward and am confident that our younger generations will see it through and celebrate its success.”   

Rich Boehne, Horizon Community Funds Council of Trustees: “Setting up this conservation and greenway fund, and bringing the many tools of Horizon Community Funds to the effort, will be foundational in reaching long-term goals for development of the Licking River as a leading destination for recreational and environmental tourism. The fund also will be a platform for supporting and facilitating investments in the conservation and health of this critical watershed that binds together a significant portion of the Commonwealth.”

Amy Winkler, District Coordinator of Campbell County Conservation District: “The opportunity that has arisen and made possible through the Licking River Conservation and Greenway Fund has connected numerous organizations for the purpose of land conservation and recreational uses. The Campbell County Conservation District looks forward to working with these groups through our common goal of being good stewards of the land and highlighting the natural beauty of the Licking River Corridor. Our Hawthorne Crossing Conservation Area is just one step toward conserving the Licking River corridor in Campbell County.”

Chris Kaeff, Kenton County Soil & Water Conservation District: “On the map, it may serve as the official boundary line between the counties, but in reality, the Licking River brings the people of Northern Kentucky together. It is an essential feature of our shared landscape, our shared heritage, and our shared future. The new Licking River Conservation and Greenway Fund will provide critical resources to the public agencies and nonprofits, on both sides of the river, who are dedicated to improving the health and vitality of this magnificent waterway. The Kenton County Conservation District welcomes the opportunity to work with new partners through the Fund in order to protect the natural beauty of the Morning View Heritage Area and enhance public recreational access to the river.”

Donavan Hornsby, Campbell County Conservancy: "As stewards of the land, Northern Kentucky residents and stakeholders have an opportunity to elevate land conservation and stream restoration to the same level of reverence and commitment afforded by the community to values such as public safety, education, and economic vitality. Many recognize that these core values are interdependent and crucial to our collective future. Realization of our potential as a region will require acceleration and deepening of conservation's impacts. We greatly appreciate Horizon Community Funds’ commitment to and investment in that realization."

Wade Johnston, Director of Tri-State Trails at Green Umbrella: "Many of us drive over the Licking River on a daily basis, but few have an opportunity to interact with the scenic and historic waterway. The unprecedented multi-jurisdictional effort to conserve and celebrate the Licking River corridor will make this amazing asset more accessible to Northern Kentuckians. The Licking River Conservation and Greenway Fund is a critical tool to enable the community to take part in preserving this natural resource for future generations.”

About Horizon Community Funds 

Horizon Community Funds of Northern Kentucky is a qualified public charitable 501(c)(3) organization established as a community foundation in 2017 by Northern Kentucky leaders. Its mission is to unite resources to raise the quality of life for all people in the Northern Kentucky community. Learn more at www.horizonfunds.org



PDS has moved to Covington!

Posted on September 23, 2019

PDS has made the official move to our new Covington location! We're still settling in, but we're open for business.

Come to the 3rd floor front desk for Infrastructure Engineering and GIS departments. Planning & Zoning and Building Codes are on the 4th floor. 

The Kenton County Planning Commission, PDS Management Board, and PDS Council will now be holding their hearings here in the Kenton County Chambers on the 2nd floor at their regular scheduled date and time. 

Address:
1840 Simon Kenton Way, Suite 3400
Covington, KY  41011-2999

 

 

 

 

 

From I-71/75 N
• Take the 12th Street/MLK exit
• At the intersection, cross MLK onto Simon Kenton Way
• Entrance to new county building is on the right

From I-71/75 S
• Take the 12th Street/MLK exit
• At MLK, turn left and go under the expressway
• Turn left onto Simon Kenton Way
• Entrance to new county building is on the right

 



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